The Purpose of Life

The Purpose of Life

Squares.

If you haven’t noticed, the bulk of my posts throughout this year have revolved around one solitary idea: the purpose of life. It could be that I’m just at that age, you know? Mid-twenties, feeling compelled to question any and everything. Or, which I’m more inclined to believe, it could be that I’m just a product of my environment — an environment that’s forced me to figure things out for myself since Lake Street was predominately black and Cartoon Network was on 24b. My 80’s babies know what I’m talking about.
Since I’ve had this disjoint, so to speak, for the better part of 25 years, I’ve gotten in a habit of asking questions and answering them myself, at least to the best of my ability, which could explain why I’m such a deep thinker to begin with.  The questions that have afflicted me most, as of late, have largely centered on how life is supposed to be lived i.e. what should we spend our time doing – how do we maneuver successfully around the traps – how do we squeeze the most joy out of each passing second? These questions, and thoughts associated with them, literally cross my mind day in and day out; they plague me. I see an enumerable amount people just LIVING . . . no rhyme or reason to his or her everyday existence.  They go to work, come home, play video games, watch TV, and/or fuck on their significant other, if they have one, go to sleep, repeat for five days, then try their best to shake things up for the weekend—living for the weekend, in a sense.  And over the course of the last six months, I’ve noticed myself falling into this same pattern. So, naturally, my lack of fulfillment and utter discontentment with my current situation only lead to more questions:
Is this it? Is this all there is to life? All to look forward to? Am I the only one that has a problem with it? That sees something vastly wrong with this picture?
Of course not.
We all feel it. We feel it every time we wake up at the crack of dawn, cursing our alarm clocks, to go to our menial ass jobs. We feel it every moment we spend doing something we don’t want to do, instead indulging in the activities that truly add value to our lives. We feel it day after day, hour after hour – yet we do nothing.  We’re essentially being robbed of the essence of life on a daily basis, and we do nothing. I mean . . . what could we do? We have to make this money, right? Mufucker’s gotta eat.
But at what expense?
You can walk up to any old timer right now and ask them what their biggest regret in life is, and 98% of them will say, “I wish I had done more . . . took more risks . . . spent more time with my friends and family . . . slowed down . . . traveled . . . followed my dreams  . . . lived.” None of them will say they wish they WORKED more, at least not on somebody else’s dime. How many of us are heading down that exact same path? One that only leads to a sea of regret, resentment, and shoulda – coulda – woulda’s?
Most of us, unfortunately.
But it doesn’t have to be that way. I believe that every human being walking this earth is a creator by nature. It’s sewn into the very fabric of every man, woman, and child on the planet. Not only are we all capable of creating, but, in my opinion, it’s what we we’re created to do. We’re not meant to be cogs in the machine. We’re not meant to participate in mindless activities, to have our very personhood reduced to a task—I’m a cashier, I’m a salesman, I’m an accountant, I’m a bus driver, I’m a customer service rep, I’m an administrative assistant, I’m a – I’m a— no. You’re so much more than that, so much more than what you do. Everyone has something of value to add to this world. Everyone. It’s just a matter of figuring out what it is.
If you are your job, you’re not living.
Right now, the way our system is constructed, not just in America, but all over the world, human capital is the most underappreciated and underutilized resource on the planet. Hands down.  And in order for us to truly prosper, that has to change. We can’t continue to take ourselves for granted.
Money Schmoney. If you’re not fulfilled, what’s it all for? Contrary to popular belief, we can’t BUY fulfillment. Sure, this Macbook Pro I just copped is the beez knees, as well as this iphone 5; they’re my babies, but I’m still the saddest mufucker walking most of the time. I’m sure that 50 inch you copped on Black Friday ain’t keeping you warm at night either, nor are those 150 dollar shoes you got in the mail. The accumulation of POSSESSIONS are just small, insignificant wins that ultimately mean nothing in the grand scheme of things.
To conclude my thoughts, I’d like for you to ask yourself a series of questions. Really think about your answers and what they mean in regards to well being:
1. Are you fulfilled? Not happy, which is fleeting, but fulfilled?
2. Do you have enough time for you, your friends, AND your family?
3. Do you love your job? Do you even LIKE your job?
4. If you were to slip on some ice outside your house and DIE. Would you be okay with how you lived    your life? What you accomplished?
5. If you have a passion (which everyone should), do you have time to dedicate to it?
6. Where do you see yourself in 2 years? 5 years? Be realistic.
7. What were some of your past goals? Did you accomplish them? What are some of your future goals?
With how you’re currently living, will you accomplish them?
8. Do you feel undervalued and underutilized? If so, what are you doing to change it?
9. Is your life stuck on repeat? Do you live for the weekend? Two days out of seven?
And I’ll leave it at that. We can’t take our lives for granted, people. We can’t. We value what doesn’t matter in life (things, wealth, entertainment), astronomically more than we value the things that do (relationships, our minds, our bodies, our spirit).
I understand we’re all just victims of our system – but we at least owe it to ourselves to try not to be . . . to fight for our livelihoods, so to speak.
Until next time,
MicRNS

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